Gay, bisexual men more likely to suffer skin cancer, study shows

Gay and bisexual men are more likely to suffer skin cancer than straight men, according to a study.

According to the researchers from Brigham and Women’s Hospital in the US, rates of skin cancer were higher among gay and bisexual men compared to heterosexual men but lower among bisexual women than heterosexual women.

Rates of skin cancer were 8.1 percent among gay men and 8.4 percent among bisexual men, statistically higher than the rate of 6.7 percent among heterosexual men.

Smaller studies have reported higher usage of indoor tanning beds among sexual minority men, a known risk factor for skin cancer.

“It’s absolutely critical that we ask about sexual orientation and gender identity in national health surveys; if we never ask the question, we’d never know that these differences exist,” said corresponding author Arash Mostaghimi from the Brigham.